The 104th New Brunswick Regiment of Foot

In the winter of 1813 British North America (now Canada) was at war with the United States. The 104th New Brunswick Regiment of Foot set off on a trek from Fredericton, New Brunswick to Kingston, Ontario (a journey of more than 1100 kilometres) to join the fighting. They marched in snowshoes along the frozen St. John River in temperatures of 27° below zero Fahrenheit through snow 5 feet deep. Every afternoon they had to halt their march and begin preparing their shelters for the night. These they constructed from pine trees they cut in the forest.

They became storm-stayed at lake Lake Témiscouata and a party of three men (Lieutenant Charles Rainsford, Baptiste Gaie and Pierre Patriot) snowshoed 145 kilometres to get help and supplies.

The Regiment did make it to Kingston and they were able to reinforce British troops there, thereby helping to stop American incursions.

2012 will mark the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812. The St. John River Society in New Brunswick has compiled research from varied sources in order to map out the definitive route taken by the 104th Regiment of Foot. I was asked to create illustrations recreating the regiment’s shelter building process and Lieutenant Rainsford’s mission.

The 104th New Brunswick Regiment of Foot setting up their shelters

Soldiers of The 104th New Brunswick Regiment of Foot setting up their shelters

Lieutenant Charles Rainsford, Baptiste Gaie and Pierre Patriot in search of help

Lieutenant Charles Rainsford (at left) and his men in search of help

Macbeth Act 4 Scene 1

Macbeth and the witches

Macbeth meets with the witches. Prophetic visions are conjured up.

“Ay, sir, all this is so. But why Stands Macbeth thus amazedly?”

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NotaBle Acts Summer Theatre Festival

The NotaBle Acts Summer Theatre Festival takes place in Fredericton every year in late July. It showcases plays written by New Brunswick playwrights. This year marks its tenth anniversary and I created the illustration for the poster.

NotaBle Acts Summer Theatre Festival poster illustration

Mingling with the crowd around the cake are characters from NotaBle Acts’ previous years as well as those from this year’s offerings.

Down in front, wearing the red shirt and helping himself to a piece of cake, is the writer Alden Nowlan who is the subject of a biographical play by Rick Merrill.

Alden Nowlan

Here’s the rough sketch the figure of Nowlan is based on:

Alden Nowlan head

King Lear

This year Bard in the Barracks is staging Shakespeare’s King Lear and I created an illustration of King Lear and the fool for the poster. The concept was Lear as an Edwardian fairy tale. Here are some initial sketches where the costumes were refined:

King Lear and the fool in the storm - sketch 1

King Lear and the fool in the storm - sketch 2

And the final piece:

I also created a black-and-white woodcut-style version for other uses:

King Lear

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Macbeth Act 3 Scene 4

Macbeth and the Ghost of Banquo

Macbeth is haunted by the ghost of Banquo.

“Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!”

The set of drawings is now finished and I’ll be posting the remaining three images over the next few weeks.

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Macbeth Act 3 Scene 1

Macbeth and Murderers

In the fourth image of the series, Macbeth plots against his friend, Banquo.

“Both of you know Banquo was your enemy”

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Macbeth Act 2 Scene 2

Macbeth and Lady Macbeth

Macbeth has murdered King Duncan but begins to question his actions. Lady Macbeth sets him straight.

“Why did you bring these daggers from the place?”

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Macbeth Act 1 Scene 4

Macbeth and King Duncan

In this illustration, Macbeth is made Thane of Cawdor by King Duncan and he begins to imagine how much further he could rise.

“Let not light see my black and deep desires”

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Macbeth Act1 Scene3

Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches

The first in a series of 8 illustrations from Shakespeare’s Macbeth.
“All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be king hereafter!”

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